A Perfectly Normal Day

Today was one of the best days ever. We were celebrating my birthday and daughter Susan planned the day for me.

She picked me up and we hit a few craft shows in area, the first one was pretty small and not very promising. But we wound up buying some goodies at a bake sale and found a great Christmas present for a friend.

One of the vendors had painted signs/sayings for sale. One sign was perfect for Susan, but it was pretty big, so reluctantly we passed on it. We continued visiting with other vendors and a few minutes later the painting lady came up to Susan with the sign and said she wanted her to have it. She insisted upon her taking the sign. We both cried.

After two more small craft shows we wound up at a nearby cajun restaurant that we don’t get to eat at very often, especially since the guys in the family are not fans. Sorry guys, but it was as delicious as always.

Next it was time to head home for a short rest and nap.

A few hours later all five of us went out for a great dinner, I got to open birthday presents from my family that knows me all too well and an early bedtime soon beckoned.

Like I said, a perfectly normal day.

When a member of your family has a Stage 4 cancer diagnosis, those days are what we all long for and are so rare, but absolutely perfect when it happens.

King of the Prairie

Tonight will probably decide if the Thunder will be finished for this season by Sunday or whether we will live to fight another week.


In the scheme of things it’s just a small blip in all things OKC and NBA. The Thunder has had an amazing run since coming to OKC. It’s been exciting, fun, frustrating and downright disappointing at one point or another. We’ve been season ticket holders since day one and have been to at least at 90% of the games each year. The golden days of Serge, Durant, Thabo, Nick and Westbrook are long gone and are remembered fondly. But I can say without equivocation that this year, the Durantless era, the Ibakaless era and Waitersless era has been the most exciting to me. We’ve gone from a vagabond team at the beginning to quickly becoming an elite team and now to what the pundits call a non-playoff team. Judging from the last two games, they are apparently right in theory. But according to Russell Westbrook, that’s just not so.

He has willed, fought, pushed and shot the team into the playoffs. Not the team, but Westbrook. Our team has shown such promise at times, that we’ve would become giddy with anticipation of what was in the future. And others times, we can look at them on the court and ask….who are these guys?

Westbrook gets criticized for taking too many shots, for not taking enough shots, for rebounding under the basket and for not rebounding under the basket. No matter what he does, according to some, it’s not enough. I just shake my head when I read the comments. But I guarantee that any real NBA fan, would love to have him on their team. He can “play team ball” but he has to have the team behind him in basketball ability, not in cute videos (although I admit I love them).

At times I’ve wanted to play general manager, but not this year. I don’t have a clue what Presti is going to do, actually we never do. But I don’t even have a clue what I think he should do. Blow up the fringes of the team and try to replace with better players? In that case who do you get rid of? Because I guarantee that most of the ones on the fringe will develop into strong players in the next few years and I for one, don’t want to sit and watch a Sabonis and Abrines killing it on another team, after we traded them away for yet another draft pick or B team player.

I don’t envy his job at all this year, but since everyone says he is brilliant, I’ll wait to see what magic he can cook up.

The above design can be ordered on a shirt:

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HelloFresh Meal Delivery

We’ve all seen these advertised — easy meal options delivered right to your door. I’ve toyed with the idea of ordering, but often there have been drawbacks. Many are only in metropolitan areas or several ingredients still have to be purchased locally or the cost is prohibitive when shipping is added.

I stumbled upon a review for HelloFresh and was intrigued, mostly because of the idea of getting some new ideas for meals. As a senior citizen, I just don’t enjoy cooking as much as I used to, part of that is we are neither gourmets or gourmands. I also liked the idea of everything being delivered with no last minute shopping. (Scroll down for a link for a $40. discount!)

So I bit the bullet, placed my order and waited for the result.

Hello Fresh Ingredients

Yesterday a very heavy box arrived, shipped via UPS. It contained three rectangular boxes with sealed ingredients for each meal, two huge frozen cold packs and three packages of meat for the meals. At the very top of the box were three colorful 8 x 11 heavy-paper recipes with lots of illustrations.

Last night was our first meal, Thai Spiced Pork and Rice Noodle Stir-Fry. When I looked at the ingredient box, I kept thinking this is not going to be enough to satisfy us — I was so wrong. It was filling and neither one of us finished our entire dinner. It took about 10-15 minutes to cut up the veggies and another 10-15 minutes until the time it was ready to eat.

Stir Fry Pork

Verdict — Good to Very Good.

What I liked:

  • everything was included
  • delivered right on schedule
  • food was fresh tasting
  • meals I probably would not have prepared on my own
  • ability to choose between several meals offered
  • price seems reasonable
  • appears to be easy to cancel or stop for a week

What I didn’t like:

  • not all ingredients were clearly marked
  • concerned that foods will not stay cold during Oklahoma summer deliveries

Fish container

And what I thought was fun — the adorable little containers for some of the ingredients!

Price is about $10. per meal per person, but drops down a bit for family size plans. Yes, I could probably make it cheaper, but I would have to do a lot of shopping! If you’re intrigued or interested in trying this out, check out this referral link to save $40. on your first order.

Don’t lie to me. Ever.

I was just reading a personality assessment, not about me, just something in general. When this particular part hit me and hit me hard. I was talking to myself about this earlier in the day, thinking I should “forgive” someone who lied to me several years ago. Not only lied to me one time, but carried on the deception for months. I cannot even talk to them anymore, they are basically dead to me. And still are years later. I can take unpleasant news, I can take it if you don’t like me, but don’t lie to me. Ever.

All it takes is a simple glance in your direction to know you are lying to us. A lot of people don’t realize this, but being lied to really sucks for an empath. We feel it ooze into every aspect of the relationship…and it usually ends them.

As I said above, this hit me particularly hard today because an old friend’s name surfaced earlier, someone who I hadn’t talked to in years — because they lied to me. At the time the truth would have bothered me, but I would have gotten over it and all would have been good.

Levis: The Jeans that Won the West

Note: This was an article written by Joe Caro that he was generous enough to share with Collectibles readers on About.com. The article has been redirected, so it’s being reproduced here for your reading enjoyment.
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Levi Jeans — at one time or another, they were called britches, trousers, overalls, pants and finally jeans. They were guaranteed to shrink, fade and wrinkle and were originally made from brown, canvas sail-cloth intended for use as miners’ tents and Conestroga wagon covers. Invented by a 24-year old German immigrant dry-goods salesman, they are as American as apple pie! We know them fondly today as “501’s”.

When a young Levi Strauss arrived in a bustling, noisy San Francisco in 1853, the rush for California gold riches was still in high gear. The son of a Bavarian dry-good peddler, Levi expected that the mining camps would welcome the buttons, scissors, thread and bolts of fabric that he had brought with him, along with yards of canvas sail cloth that he intended to sell for tent-making and as covers for the the Conestoga wagons that dotted every stream and river.

Opening a little store on California Street with his brother-in-law David Stern, they were immediately successful and their reputation and business grew. It is reported that Levi was often found leading a pack-horse, heavily laden with his merchandise, directly into the mining camps throughout the region. The story goes that both prospectors and miners, often complaining about the easily torn cotton “britches” and pockets that “split right out” gave Levi the idea to make a rugged “overall” trouser for the miners to wear. They were fashioned from bolts of brown canvas sailcloth with gold ore storing pockets that were nearly impossible to split.

Exhausting his original supply of canvas, as the demand grew for his long-wearing overalls, Levi switched to a sturdy fabric called serge, which was made in Nimes, France. Originally called serge de Nimes, this name was soon shortened to “denim”. And, with the development of an indigo dye, the brown color was soon replaced with the now familiar deep blue, the trademark color of most jeans made today.

Another novel trademark, the riveting process, was patented in 1873 and was used to add even more strength to the pocket corners and stress areas of the pants, in addition to another Levi hallmark, using a double stitching or arcuate pattern on the hip pockets, to further increase pocket strength. In 1886, the Two-Horse brand leather patch was first introduced and in 1890, lot numbers were assigned to all products including lot “501”, which contained the first watch pocket.

It is interesting to note that Levi Strauss always disliked the term “jeans” to describe his … well… jeans! The word “jeans” it seems, is derived from the French word genes that was long associated with cotton trousers worn by Italian sailors. It is reported that Levi, and everyone working for him, referred to his denim trousers as waist-high overalls until long after his death in 1902. Not until the mid-1930’s did the company ever refer to them as jeans.

Originally designed as cinch pants to be worn with suspenders, the firm added belt loops in 1922, the red Levi’s tab in 1936 and removed the crotch rivet in 1941. It’s widely rumored that the crotch rivet removal was long overdue and attributed to a troublesome problem suffered by many cowhands while crouching near a roaring campfire on chilly nights out on the range. The story goes that the president of the company, Walter A. Haas, while wearing a new pair of “501’s” experienced first-hand what cowboys had been complaining about for years. Crouched down like that, it seems, the rivet at the base of the fly is mostly exposed to the fire and is an excellent conductor of heat. Shortly after his experience, and by executive order, this single offending rivet was removed forever!

Not a company to change its successful line of clothing without good cause, Levi’s continued to sell its denim overalls with both suspender buttons and belt loops until 1937 when they discontinued the suspender attachments. The next flurry of changes (after the removal of the crotch rivet in 1941) occurred in the ’50’s when the pattern was re-cut for a more tapered leg and pre-shrunk overalls were introduced. 1955 was the year that zippers were introduced to Levi Strauss’s famous overalls with other lots like “Lighter Blues” that marked the company’s entry into the sportswear business. The popularity of the Levi’s jeans grew to such an extent that during World War II the government declared them an essential commodity, and sales were restricted only to defense workers. Demand and price skyrocketed!

With the popularity of the Western movie and stars like John Wayne, Gary Cooper, Gene Autry and Roy Rogers, blue jeans were all the rage. What were originally designed as prospectors working britches now gained the irresistible aura of romance and adventure. The bad-boy, devil-may-care image of Marlon Brando and James Dean in the 1950s established blue jeans as the uniform of the day for the baby boomer generation. In 1960, the company dropped the word overalls from all advertising and finally started calling jeans — “jeans”.

From the California 49’ers to cowboys who were home on the range, to Rosie the Riveter, James Dean and Garth Brooks, the pants that young Levi made, especially lot “501”, have been with us now for well over 100 years. In over 70 countries throughout the world, everyone knows his first name, and continues to eagerly buy millions of of pairs of his pants that are still guaranteed to shrink, wrinkle and fade.

Okay Kevin, let me get this straight . . .

What a wake-up it has been this summer for Thunder fans.

We find out that — he didn’t like playing with Westbrook, he doesn’t like all the attention received in Oklahoma City (just weeks after he talked about how he loved his easy-going life here) and lastly now it comes out that he doesn’t like to play under pressure! What? This is when all of this comes out? Now? Really?

It was apparent in the weeks leading up to the decision that Durant wasn’t planning to stay. His body language during the playoffs, his play during the playoffs and his disappearing act right after the Thunder were out, all made me predict in early June that he was going to be gone. I didn’t necessarily want it to happen, but I was also not too upset about him leaving. Fans could tell his head and heart weren’t in the games. Although he wasn’t limping, many fans in the stands wondered if his foot was bothering him again. He just wasn’t himself or maybe he was and this was his way of showing us. We kept waiting for him to have a game from the days of old, one of those games where he took over and made those incredible shots to win the game. It wasn’t going to be, although there were occasional games during the playoffs when we thought — maybe he’s back.

Instead it was Westbrook, like he has all season long, that came out with the passion and fire of someone who wanted to win. With the spotlight on Westbrook with his record-setting season and passion evident for all to see, perhaps that’s what helped make the final decision go the way it did. Durant didn’t look like the team leader as much as Westbrook did, even though everyone still called Durant the leader, he had to know down deep that it wouldn’t be too long before it would be widely recognized that Westbrook was the true leader of the team. Perhaps that’s what his revolving door entourage was whispering in his ear, get out now.

Don’t get me wrong, I have absolutely no problem with a twenty-some year old young man wanting to change jobs, that’s most certainly his right. But what I and so many others have a problem with is going to the team that he basically handed a win to in the last few minutes of game six with his multiple turnovers and shooting something like 1 for 7 when it mattered. And then the most disagreeable member of the other team starts bragging on how he was recruiting Durant all year long, including during the playoffs. That’s where the problem is with me and that’s why he will never be thought of the same way here in Oklahoma City. Any other team, we wouldn’t have liked it, but Golden State, come on, that’s just way wrong.